Organization Looking For Volunteers, Coaches And Players To Expand In Spring 2021

ATLANTA, Ga. (CW69 News at 10) — A national athletic organization that started right here at home is opening doors for baseball players on the autism spectrum or with other disabilities, and they need your help to keep the ball rolling.

Taylor Duncan, the CEO and executive director of Alternative Baseball, a 501c3 organization he started in 2016, loves to talk in his radio voice when sharing his story. “Look out COVID-19, here comes Alternative Baseball’s movement to #Power Through Perceptions and Greater Atlanta, this is where it all started,” he said in an interview with CW69’s Valencia Jones.

It all started in Dallas, Georgia with a little boy with big dreams of playing baseball. Doctors diagnosed Taylor Duncan with autism spectrum disorder when he was four years old. “As I got older, I faced a lot of preconceived ideas about what one can and cannot accomplish, being on the autism spectrum,” said Duncan, who is now 24 years old. “

It gives teenagers ages 15 and up, and adults with autism and other disabilities, a chance to play the sport they love. “We can’t pay our players millions of dollars in contracts, or have big million dollar stadiums, but we can give our players an experience that’s priceless,” he said.

They play under the same rules as the Major Leagues, and they also gain the social and physical skills to succeed in life. Alternative Baseball quickly expanded from first base in the Metro Atlanta area to cities across the nation. “We work with everyone to break those glass ceilings, to power through those perceptions,” Duncan said.

Their funding was cut, as businesses started taking losses during the pandemic. So they’re looking for players, volunteers and coaches to prepare for the Spring season.

Duncan says he’s welcoming all those future players and volunteers to a new season, with open gloves.

For information or to sign up, click here.