Ah, the Heisman Trophy!  Years ago, it was a tribute to the top player in college football.  Now it has become another overblown ESPN made-for-TV event.  That’s not to say the Heisman’s relevance is not what is used to be; it has just become over-hyped, to the point to where it outshines the game itself.

Through the years there have been many Heisman Trophy winners who have had remarkable NFL career. But for every player like Roger Staubach and Barry Sanders, there are three players who have flopped… like Tim Tebow, Archie Griffin and Gino Torretta.

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So, enjoy, if you will, and remember your favorite college football star whose NFL career was a bust.  If you have one or two you would like to add to the list, send us your opinion on Facebook or Twitter.

Texas A&;M quarterback Johnny Manziel #2 looks to pass at Kyle Field on April 13, 2013 in College Station, Texas. (Photo by Scott Halleran/Getty Images)

Texas A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel #2 looks to pass at Kyle Field on April 13, 2013 in College Station, Texas. (Photo by Scott Halleran/Getty Images)

5.) Johnny Manziel, Texas A&M (2012)

Okay, theoretically “Johnny Football’s” career is not over.  He is still young enough to get his life together and have an NFL career.  However, it’s obvious his decision-making skills in life are not nearly as good as they are on the field.  His red-shirt freshman year with the Aggies (2012) was one of the best for a quarterback in college football history. He became the first freshman to pass for 3000 and rush for 1000 yards in a season. That season, he won the SEC Freshman of the Year and College Football Freshman of the Year Awards.  He also won the Davey O’Brien Award as the top college football quarterback in the nation, then the Heisman.  He was drafted 22nd overall by the Browns in 2014 and ended up starting in eight games with seven touchdowns and seven interceptions in two seasons in the NFL.

4.)  Eric Crouch, Nebraska (2001)

Quarterback Eric Crouch of Nebraska walks of the fields during the Rose Bowl National Championship game against Miami in 2002 (Brian Bahr/Getty Images)

Quarterback Eric Crouch of Nebraska walks off the field during the Rose Bowl National Championship game against Miami in 2002 (Brian Bahr/Getty Images)

Crouch was a tremendous dual-threat quarterback in his senior season (2001) in Lincoln. He threw for 1,510 yards with seven touchdowns and ran the ball 203 times for 1,115 yards and 18 scores. He won both the Heisman and Davey O’Brien awards after that season. Crouch was picked by St. Louis in the third round in 2002.  The Rams wanted him to play wide-out. Instead, he left the Rams and the NFL in September without ever playing a game. Reports said he was too banged up by the time he reached the NFL.

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Quarterback Danny Wuerffel #7 of the Florida Gators runs with the ball Arkansas in 1996. (Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)

Quarterback Danny Wuerffel #7 of the Florida Gators runs with the ball Arkansas in 1996. (Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)

3.)  Danny Wuerffel, Florida (1996)

Wuerffel was the cornerstone of the great Steve Spurrier teams of the ’90s.  As the Gators’ quarterback, he led the NCAA in touchdown passes in both his junior (1995) and senior (1996) seasons.  He finished his college career in Gainesville with 10,875 yards passing and a QB rating of 163.6.  During his senior season, he won every award imaginable, including the Heisman, while leading Florida to the national championship.  Wuerffel was a fourth round draft pick by New Orleans in 1997, but was cut by the Saints in 2000.  He spent time with the Packers and Bears before the Redskins, then coached by Spurrier who picked him up in a trade. He never panned out in Washington, was cut in 2003 and called it quits in 2004.

2.) Rashaan Salaam, Colorado (1994)

Rashaan Salaam #19 help Colorado to an 11-1 record during his junior season (Getty Images)

Rashaan Salaam #19 helps Colorado to an 11-1 record during his junior season (Getty Images)

In 1994, during his junior season, Salaam rushed for 2,055 yards becoming the fourth college player to run for more than 2,000 yards in a season.  His best game that season was against Texas when he ran for an incredible 362 yards.  His efforts that season helped the Buffaloes to an 11-1 mark. He won the Heisman that season and decided to forgo his senior season and enter the NFL Draft.  Chicago picked Salaam in the first round 21st overall. After a fine rookie season in which he ran for over 1,000 yards, things went downhill. He spent two more unproductive years with the Bears where injuries and a reported “marijuana addiction” unraveled his career.  He gave it one more try in 2003 with the 49ers, but was released, ending his career.

Quarterback Andre Ware of the Houston Cougars looks on during a game against Rice in December, 1989 (Getty Images)

Quarterback Andre Ware of the Houston Cougars looks on during a game against Rice in December, 1989 (Getty Images)

1.) Andre Ware, Houston (1989)

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Ware was a sensation during his junior season in Houston, throwing for 4,699 yards and 46 touchdowns.  He also set 26 NCAA records that season and was named the winner of both the Davey O’Brien and Heisman awards.  He decided to leave Houston after that record-setting season and enter the NFL Draft.  He was a first round pick (7th overall) of the Detroit Lions but never blossomed into the superstar everyone predicted. He played in only four seasons with both the Lions and Vikings before moving on to a lackluster CFL career.  The flip side is that Ware has had a pretty good career in the announcing booth with both the Houston Texans and ESPN.