Sports

Report: Univ. Of Georgia Advises Basketball Players ‘Orgies And Gang Bangs Are Inappropriate’

Benjamin Fearnow
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Research into college athletic departments’ codes of conduct uncovered some questionable policies, including University of Georgia guidelines suggesting that players avoid “orgies and gang bangs,” and noticeable sexual “passion marks” on their bodies. (Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)

Research into college athletic departments’ codes of conduct uncovered some questionable policies, including University of Georgia guidelines suggesting that players avoid “orgies and gang bangs,” and noticeable sexual “passion marks” on their bodies. (Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)

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Athens, Ga. (CBS ATLANTA) – Research into college athletic departments’ codes of conduct uncovered some questionable policies, including University of Georgia guidelines suggesting that players avoid “orgies and gang bangs,” and noticeable sexual “passion marks” on their bodies.

The Student Press Law Center, in partnership with University of Maryland journalism students, put together a report on social media exposure through public records on college athletic departments. Much of the project shows that student-athletes’ social media accounts are monitored (“anything you write can and will be quoted”), and counsels that players should avoid controversial online posts.

But the “Sunshine Week” report also uncovered detailed school guidelines on appearance, including the University of Georgia’s policy stating that the Bulldogs basketball coaches want “no braids” and “should never see the crack of you’re a**.” And additional policies for the school’s basketball team regarding sexual violence: “No means no” and “treat women with respect, and “passion marks should not ever be noticed by coaches.”

Although University of Georgia basketball coach Mark Fox declined to comment on the report, one school policy states that school and team officials have the right to inspect “dorm cleanliness” and “can enter [the players’] dorm at any time.”

And while some of the more mundane policies at some schools advise students against things such as excessive cell phone use and signing a Twitter agreement with the coach, the University of Georgia policies on personal behavior delve into some bizarre ethical and sexual details:

“You don’t own your girlfriend.”

“Stay out of gray areas, Orgies and gang bangs are inappropriate.”

“Birth control is your responsibility too.”

“Don’t spend all your energy in the bed all night.”

“Hicky’s/passion marks should not ever be noticed by coaches.”

“One. Not two or three girlfriends…”

Outside of the explicit sexual suggestions from the University of Georgia, the report taps into school policies that restrict first and fourth amendment rights of the student-athletes. Concerning the Georgia basketball team policies, one legal expert said the players should fight the “patently ridiculous” guidelines.

“[The guidelines are] very broad,” said Howard Wasserman, a Florida International University lawyer who specializes in sports. “They can get away with it because the athletes are going to let them get away with it.”

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