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Study: Asthma Patients Might Have More Fertility Issues

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File photo of a pregnant woman holding her stomach. (Photo by Ian Waldie/Getty Images)

File photo of a pregnant woman holding her stomach. (Photo by Ian Waldie/Getty Images)

ATLANTA (CBS Atlanta) – A team of scientists learned that women who suffer from asthma might have more trouble getting pregnant than women who do not.

The team involved in the study, who were based in the Bispebjerg University Hospital in Denmark, observed the previously documented connection by studying sets of twins, Medical News Today is reporting.

By observing pairs of twins specifically, researchers noted that they were able to more directly compare those who did and did not have asthma without having to make allowances for lifestyle or genetic differences.

In all, more than 15,000 twins between the ages of 12 and 41 were said to have participated in the study.

Through their questioning, researchers found that 27 percent of the women with asthma had to wait longer to get pregnant, while just 21.6 percent of the group without asthma had the same issue.

The study’s lead author, Dr. Elisabeth Juul Gade, recommended that controlling one’s asthma might help lessen the effects of the respiratory disorder on fertility.

“Our results shed light on the complex interactions between fertility and asthma,” she was quoted as saying. “Although we observed women with asthma experiencing longer waiting times to pregnancy, our findings suggest that if women take their medication and control their asthma, they can reduce this delay.”

Asthma is defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta as “a disease that affects your lungs … [and] causes repeated episodes of wheezing, breathlessness, chest tightness, and nighttime or early morning coughing.”

“Asthma can be controlled by taking medicine and avoiding the triggers that can cause an attack,” CDC researchers additionally noted. “You must also remove the triggers in your environment that can make your asthma worse.”

The study was published in the European Respiratory Journal.

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