News

Global Slavery Index Reports Modern Slavery Across Globe Still Exists

View Comments
(Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

(Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

Get Breaking News First

Receive News, Politics, and Entertainment Headlines Each Morning.
Sign Up

Atlanta (WAOK/AP London) — International charity organization, the Walk Free Foundation, has issued findings in a report titled “Global Slavery Index” that claims the west African country of Mauritania, Haiti, and the country of Pakistan statistically have the largest instances of modern slavery in the entire world.

The Walk Free Foundation was founded by Australian mining magnate Andrew Forrest and his index has been endorsed by numerous high-profile politicians and businessmen such as Hillary Clinton, Tony Blair, and Bill Gates. the index found that the most common practices of modern slavery are forced and bonded labor, human trafficking, forced marriages, sexual exploitation, and the use of children in the military.

The “Global Slavery Index” was put together by the Walk Free Foundation using numerous reports from governments and non-profit organizations, as well as statistical estimates. The foundation’s report found that the people of Mauritania often inherit slave status from their ancestors and that of an approximate population of 3.8 million people, the nation enslaves an estimated 160,000 people. In Haiti, one in 10 children are trapped within the child labor system. In Pakistan, child labor and forced marriages are the most common type of modern slavery.

In absolute terms of modern slavery in countries, the report found that India, China, Pakistan, and Nigeria have the highest numbers of people enslaved. India has an estimated 13.95 million people in slavery while China has an approximate number of 2.95 million, followed by Pakistan with 2.1 million. The continent of Asia has the highest population of slavery with 72 percent of people in modern slavery living within the continent.

Written by Sherman H. Smith Jr. (WAOK/Intern)

View Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,172 other followers