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Finally A Starter, Lance Moore Is Dancing It Up For The New Orleans Saints

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By Danny Cox

Name: Lance Moore – RB  – #16
Height: 5’9″
Weight: 190 lbs.
Age: 29
Hometown:Columbus, OH
College:Toledo
Experience: 8 years

NEW ORLEANS, LA - NOVEMBER 06:  Lance Moore #16 of the New Orleans Saints pulls in this touchdown reception against E.J. Biggers #31 of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers at Mercedes-Benz Superdome on November 6, 2011 in New Orleans, Louisiana.  (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)

(Credit, Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)

Ever since Drew Brees and Sean Payton arrived on the scene in New Orleans, it has been all about the offense with the Saints. Brees can make a target out of any player on the field, and it has led to a great number of guys succeeding in a passing-oriented offense. With that being said, it created a crowded corps of wide receivers in the “Big Easy.”

That has not made it easy for Lance Moore, who went undrafted out of college, to make his way to the top of an offense that is one of the most explosive in the entire NFL. It is what he’s done though, and he has worked for every bit of it.

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During his senior season at Westerville South High School in Ohio, Lance Moore showed that he was ready for the next level. He set state high school records with 103 receptions and 24 touchdown catches in a single season. With stats like that, would a college be willing to overlook the fact that he was a mere 5 foot 9 inches?

Moore went to Toledo University, and immediately made an impact.

Throughout his time in college, Moore played in 50 career games racking up 222 receptions for 2,776 yards and 25 touchdowns. He set a record as being the only Toledo player in history to gain over 1,000 yards receiving twice. As a senior, Moore also set a record with 14 touchdown receptions in a single season.

Lance Moore had incredible stat lines in a weak football conference in college, but again, would someone be willing to take the chance on a short wide receiver? This time, in the NFL?

The 2005 NFL Draft came and went and Moore went undrafted. The Cleveland Browns signed him, but released him soon after. That was when the New Orleans Saints signed him to their practice squad for the season. In 2006, he headed over to NFL Europe and played for the Berlin Thunder. Upon returning, he played in four games for the Saints as a wide receiver and returner, but did virtually nothing to make an impact.

During the 2007 season, Moore got playing time in all 16 games and finished with 32 receptions for 302 yards and two touchdowns. He was certainly proving his worth with the Saints, and it showed.

In 2008, Moore collected 79 receptions for 928 yards and 10 touchdowns. His time had finally come, and he was proving himself, but the Saints still had too many skilled receivers on the squad. That’s why in 2009, when Moore got injured and missed half the season, it didn’t hurt the team much.

Upon his return to health, Moore shined once again in 2010 and 2011, catching eight touchdowns in each. Come 2012, Moore had an incredible season as he caught 65 receptions for 1,041 yards and six touchdowns. It looked as if he was truly ready for the spotlight, and the Saints agreed.

After the 2012 season, the Saints made no attempt to re-sign free agent wide receiver Devery Henderson. New Orleans made it fully aware to everyone that their number one wide receiver is Marques Colston and starting opposite him would be Lance Moore.

Good things come in small packages and to those that work for it. Lance Moore is living proof of that.

For more NFL player features, visit 32 Players, 32 Days.

Danny Cox knows a little something about the NFL, whether it means letting you know what penalty will come from the flag just thrown on the field or quickly spouting off who the Chicago Bears drafted in the first round of the 1987 draft (Jim Harbaugh). He plans on bringing you the best news, previews, recaps, and anything else that may come along with the exciting world of the National Football League. His work can be found on Examiner.com.

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