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CDC: Children Eating, Drinking Fewer Calories

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File photo of a partially eaten double hamburger. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

File photo of a partially eaten double hamburger. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

CBS Atlanta (con't)

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ATLANTA (CBS Atlanta) — New research indicates that children are consuming fewer calories than they did at the turn of the century.

HealthDay is reporting that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta have observed a decline in the amount of calories kids are eating and drinking in contrast to 13 years ago.

The CDC’s report is based on the findings reported by the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

From 1999-2000 to 2009-2010, the average amount of calories consumed by boys fell from 2,258 to 2,100. In girls, a drop from 1,831 calories to 1,755 was reportedly observed.

The survey additionally indicated several shifts in eating habits.

According to HealthDay, both genders are eating significantly smaller amounts of bread-based carbohydrates – from 55 percent to 54.3 percent in boys, and from 55.8 percent to 54.5 percent in girls. The study also indicated an increase in the consumption of lean proteins such as meats, beans and nuts.

“This certainly reflects an improvement in food and drink-related decisions,” Rebecca Solomon, coordinator of clinical nutrition at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City, told U.S. News & World Report. “It would seem that education and public awareness about the importance of maintaining a healthy body weight may finally be getting to its intended audience.”

She added, “Hopefully if we teach children the importance of appropriate calorie intake and nutrient balance, we will reverse the obesity problem over the next several decades.”

Not all demographics experienced a shift in health habits, HealthDay learned. Black and Mexican-American girls did not exhibit the same declines in negative eating habits.

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